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The Rise of Reusable

The Rise of Reusable

483 words. 2 minute 30 second read. 

The coffee industry has seen a surge in reusable cups over the last 5 years. With conscious effort on behalf of both retailers and customers to cut the amount of waste produced, one of the most notable trends is the rise of the reusable cup. There’s more to the cup than a nicer feel and look though – when you look at the numbers, they really are remarkable…

Some retailers have completely removed single use provision. Waitrose no longer provides single use cups for their bean-to-cup machine, while last week M&S extended their trial of a ‘zero-waste’ section in a supermarket. We are lucky to be on the doorstep of the Clean Kilo Co in Birmingham who have been a pioneer of the zero waste movement.

The Numbers

Forbes reported last year that 8 trillion pieces of plastic were dumped into the world’s oceans each year, with 91% of plastic going un-recycled. A reusable cup will provide absolutely no waste per 75 uses, compared to 1,500g of waste with a disposable single use cup. As a result, for every 1 million reusable cups replacing single use, 1000 tonnes of carbon emissions would be avoided, and 300 tonnes of waste would be saved – the equivalent to the energy used by an average UK household for 75 years… 

Our Ethos

As many of our members are aware, at Revolver we pride ourselves on our environmental standards. It is important to help our customers transition away from single use cups when purchasing their coffee at bean to cup machines, like our recent installation at Southmoor. Whilst the cups we provide are compostable and biodegradable, we know there is an added sense of value that comes with the ownership of a high quality, environmentally friendly reusable vessel.  

For these reasons, both environmental and customer focused, we have expanded our range of popular reusable cups with four new offerings, beautifully decorated with William Morris prints. For our cooperative, innovation has always taken centre stage in guiding our direction. We endeavour to consistently find the best solutions for consumers, members and the environment. 

 Hannah Birch, Head of Commercials at Revolver, said ‘We’re really proud of our new range of William Morris reusable cups. It’s so important that we’re able to offer a variety of designs to our customers, and it’s an important step in helping people change their behaviour away from single use. This is just another small example of the work we’re doing to be as ethically and environmentally conscious as possible.’  

A note on style 
Our new range features William Morris prints. Morris is recognised as one of the most significant cultural figures of Victorian Britain, and held a deep set commitment and respect for the environment, so it’s only fitting that his work decorates our range. We stock Peacock, Wandle, Blackthorn, and Seaweed Marine, all available now for £10.

www.revolverworld.com/ecoffee-cups/

Except where stated, this site and it’s contents are © Copyright 2020 Revolver Co-operative Limited
All Rights Reserved.
 © Revolver World 2020.                    

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Honduras Diaries: Part 2.

Honduras Diaries: Part 2.

Honduras Diaries: Part 2 
In Honduras Diaries: Part 1, Josh introduced us to his trip to Honduras. In Part 2, he goes into more detail about the second half of the trip, including a wetmill visit and stopping by at the Honduran Institute for Coffee. 

514 words. 4 minute read. 

November 6th, Day Four: 
Our fourth day was pretty laid back and relaxed. MasterRoast organised a trip for us to visit Cofafelol, also a co-operative like Revolver, who we purchase our coffee from. We were shown around the facilities and then given the opportunity to plant a coffee plant. It was a wrap for the day, and I headed back to catch up on some sleep. 

November 7th, Day Five:
We woke up bright and early on the fifth day. The plans were to visit the wet mill at Coffee Planet and then to a coffee refinery. When we arrived at the Wet mill, we were shown the process of how raw coffee beans are processed for de-fruiting. I saw the amount of coffee beans needed to produce a ten-kilogram bag of coffee and it really went to show how much care, effort and manpower it takes to bring that one cup of coffee to our tables. 

Next on our agenda was a trip to a coffee refinery. My first impression was the sheer scale of the location and how much manpower was needed to run the facility.  We observed how coffee is processed into beans, ready to be shipped off to be roasted.  

Our first tourist excursion of the trip came about and we visited some Mayan ruins, an amazing experience. Our tour guide explained the rich, ancient history of the civilisation, how they were presumed to live and how there’s a mystery surrounding how the Mayan civilisation died out in the region

November 8th, Day Six: 

It was our last day in Honduras and our trip was coming to an end, and we closed with the busiest day of all. Our first stop was to meet with the Honduran Institute for Coffee, a government institution who oversees the country’s coffee exports (coffee makes up 40% of Honduras’ exports). Out of a small population of eight million people, an estimated one million people are directly involved within the coffee industry through their employment. 

Later on that day we visited the family that we met on the first day of our trip, and they showed us around distribution facilities in San Pedro Sula. After tasting their coffee from different parts of the country they told us that the amount of coffee that is exported out of the country is equivalent to more than the entirety of exports of El Salvador. 

My trip to Honduras had come to an end, leaving me reminiscent of a fantastic week. The trip opened my eyes tp what coffee means. It’s not just a Monday morning pick-me-up. It’s the livelihoods of communities and families whose whole lives revolve around what me and you see as a drink in a cup. I’m thankful to everyone I met during my visit to Honduras and I hope to be back soon.

If you’d like to know more about what we do, or enquire about cooperative coffee solutions for your business or society, please email enquiry@revolver.coop

What we do is simple, but revolutionary. 

https://revolverworld.com/product/ground/honduras-fairtrade-organic-200g/

Except where stated, this site and it’s contents are © Copyright 2020 Revolver Co-operative Limited
All Rights Reserved.
 © Revolver World 2020.                    

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Honduras Diaries: Part 1.

Honduras Diaries: Part 1.

582 Words, 4 minute read. By Joshua Birch 

Honduras Diaries: Part 1
As part of our series for Fairtrade Fortnight, we asked Joshua to share the story of his recent trip to Honduras, including meeting Fairtrade farmers and seeing coffee production first hand. 

A few months ago, I took a trip of a lifetime across the Atlantic, over to Honduras to visit our farmers and to meet with people involved within the coffee industry. From hiking up to the breathtakingly beautiful mountains of San Pedro, to meeting the farmers and their families, this diary entry covers the ins and outs of my trip. 

November 2nd, The Journey: 

I left the house at 5am to get my train down to London. After departing from Paddington station towards Heathrow Airport. Knowing I had a long plane ride, I decided to stretch my legs while on the train. 

 I alighted the train and made my way to check in and go through airport security. It was at that moment I discovered that my bag (that contained my passport, phone and plane ticket) was missing.

 I darted down to the platform and asked the station staff to check the train, but their search didn’t prove to be successful. For the next two hours, I was stranded with no form of contact… Eventually, a helpful member of staff allowed me back onto the train at Paddington to have one last look. By some sort of miracle, there it was. My bag was sitting on a chair with all the contents still intact! 

At this point in time I had missed my original flight, so my only option was to board a twenty-two-hour flight to Honduras, putting me one day behind schedule.  At this point, however, I really couldn’t complain – I was so relieved to be reunited with my bag and looking forward to the trip ahead, which turned out to be much more successful than the initial 4 hours…

November 3rd, Day One:
After the hectic events of yesterday it was safe to say that I was well rested and ready for the day ahead. It was an early start. I was introduced to my fellow travel companions, and we quickly got to know the group and familiarise ourselves with each other’s businesses. As the sun set on a wonderful day, we were invited to dinner at an authentic Honduran Bistro that specialised in Honduran Cuisine. After the delicious food and hours of conversation with everyone, it was time to return to my hotel to prepare for the next day. 

November 4th, Day Two: 

I was awake pretty early. After some breakfast it was time to meet our friends at Coffee Planet, a Co-op that is run by a group of Christians in Honduras. Coffee Planet helps local farmers with business queries: taking out loans on their behalf; distributing funds; administration duties etc.

Following our introductions, we headed to the coffee fields. The plants covered fields which stretched out for miles, and we met many friendly locals who highlighted a real sense of community and pride.

 

November 5th, Day Three:
Yesterday’s adventure set the mood for the rest of the trip. We headed to another coffee plantation in the mountains which operates under Coffee Planet. Upon arrival, we met with their manager and held an in depth conversation about the area. The plantation supports five thousand farmers and their families.

Something which really stood out as being impressive was a revolutionary set up which re-appropriated biomass produced from their farms to provide electricity for local communities. It was brilliant meeting everyone and seeing how they work their way around everyday life, seeing the sheer determination, commitment and hard work done by farmers. 

Check back in tomorrow for Honduras Diaries, Part 2. If you’d like to know more about what we do, or enquire about cooperative coffee solutions for your business or society, please email enquiry@revolver.coop

What we do is simple, but revolutionary. 

https://revolverworld.com/product/ground/honduras-fairtrade-organic-200g/

Except where stated, this site and it’s contents are © Copyright 2020 Revolver Co-operative Limited
All Rights Reserved.
 © Revolver World 2020.                    

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The Rise of Label Fatigue

The Rise of Label Fatigue

The Rise of Label Fatigue

Fairtrade Fortnight is a two week celebration and awareness campaign which sheds light on the important and continued work of the Fairtrade movement. As many of you who follow and support our cooperative know, Fairtrade plays an enormous role in guiding our ethics and operations. Whilst many others in the coffee and tea industry have moved to alternative ethical certifications, we have remained devoted and consistent to the work that the Fairtrade Foundation promotes.

 

What is Fairtrade in a nutshell?

Fairtrade pays farmers a consistent and fair price for their commodities, as judged by the Fairtrade International Committee in Germany. As a result, producers and farmers, such as those who grow our coffee in Honduras and tea in Sri Lanka are able to count on a stable income, and plan for a better life because of it. 

 

Label Fatigue Today, there is an ocean of independent ethical label certifications across all product ranges, each of them seeking to soothe the customer’s conscience without any clear explanation of what the logo guarantees. This has been referred to by some as ‘label fatigue’, the idea that there are so many competing label certifications that customers will default to previous purchases or price to make food choices. Put simply, there are too many labels for us to know what they all mean.

 

The Fairtrade movement runs the risk of being drowned out by competing label certifications, meaning campaigns like Fairtrade Fortnight are more important than ever. 

 

Bourton on the Water 

The importance of Fairtrade to us at Revolver and Coop Coffee has been echoed by other cooperative societies over the two week campaign, such as Midcounties Coop. At their Bourton on the Water supermarket, for example, the first thing you see upon entering the store is a Fairtrade stand, including our Ethiopia and Peru single origin coffees. 

 

We’re exceptionally proud of our relationship with the Midcounties Cooperative and other societies for their commitment to Fairtrade. As an ethical and environmentally conscious cooperative, we are mindful of the way our products are produced, so it’s a pleasure to see a shared passion in Bourton on the Water – not just with coffee and tea, but a range of offerings. 

 

You can find out more about the Fairtrade movement by heading to https://www.fairtrade.org.uk/. If you’d like to learn more about our cooperative, or become a member, email info@revolver.coop and a member of the team will be in touch. 

 

 

Revolver Coffee on display for Fairtrade Fortnight 2020
Except where stated, this site and it’s contents are © Copyright 2020 Revolver Co-operative Limited
All Rights Reserved.
 © Revolver World 2020.                    

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Revolver Brings Cooperative Coffee Solutions To Cafes and Stores.

Cooperative Café Solutions

440 words. 2 minute read. 

2020: The Year of Solutions. 
Revolver has started off 2020 by branching out into the world of cooperative coffee and vending solutions. With our first bean to cup machine installed at the brand new Midcounties Southmoor store, we are hoping to spread the offer across the cooperative economy and further.

Offering Fairtrade & Cooperative coffee and retail solutions to organisations is an important part of our philosophy and mission. We see many cooperatives being left without an alternative but to work with big industry leaders who don’t share cooperative values, so it is about time we provided a solution which aligns with the principles of the movement. 

What’s in the (eco friendly) cup?
The bean-to-cup machine provides free Fairtrade Revolver Copacabana coffee to Midcounties members, as well as our Fairtrade drinking chocolate and tea. We hope that this not only showcases a cooperative business to business model, but also promotes the benefits of membership in societies such as Midcounties. 

Using freshly ground Fairtrade coffee and fresh milk is an innovative response to alternative coffee vending machines, which often only provide powdered milk and instant coffee. Combine that award winning engineering with a beautiful design and touch screen display, and the end result really is something special – a great taste backed up by an ethical, cooperative and environmentally conscious production. 

Managing Director Paul Birch J.P. said “it’s great to be able to offer a cooperative coffee solution at last. At Revolver, we are passionate about promoting cooperative values, and our team has been working hard alongside our friends at Midcounties to offer the best possible result – the machine looks fantastic and compliments a very successful new store.” 

“Looking ahead to the rest of the year, we are hoping to work with more cooperative societies to help them provide cooperative solutions, rather than feeling like their only alternative is to work alongside other non-coop organisations.”

Looking ahead
In a few weeks time, team members Hannah Birch, George Smith, Helen Lloyd and Miya Jhamat are visiting the Amsterdam Coffee Festival, in order to find out more about cooperation on the continent and how we can continue to work alongside our European neighbours in a post Brexit Britain. 

We are passionate about bringing as much value to members, and help to grow the cooperative economy and movement. The need for cooperation seems as important now as it did 150 years ago – and at Revolver that mission is guiding our work throughout 2020 and beyond. 

If you’d like to know more about what we do, or enquire about cooperative coffee solutions for your business or society, please email enquiry@revolver.coop

What we do is simple, but revolutionary. 

 

Except where stated, this site and it’s contents are © Copyright 2020 Revolver Co-operative Limited
All Rights Reserved.
 © Revolver World 2020.                    

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Josh heads to Honduras

Josh heads to Honduras

 

While we’re all waking up this Saturday morning to start our weekend, our team member Joshua Birch will be 10,000ft above the Atlantic Ocean on route to Honduras. He’s undertaking a trip on behalf of Revolver World and Coop Coffee to learn more about the coffee growing process at source, meeting our farmers and building connections.

Other trip highlights include visits to Coffee Planet Dry Mill, as well as a visit to IHCAFE, the Honduran Coffee Institute who aim to promote socio-economic profitability of Honduran coffee growers.

Josh said ‘I’m particularly interested to visit the Honduran Coffee Institute towards the tail end of the trip, as their approach to production and business aligns with our ethos and values back home at Revolver.’

Despite being slightly nervous about his first trip for Revolver, Josh said he was looking forward to meeting farmers and other members of participating cooperatives.

“The prospect of heading out to Honduras is really exciting, not only for the opportunity to see first hand where our coffee is sourced, but also to build some relationships with our friends in the industry.”

In July alone, Honduras exported 39 million kg of coffee, making it a vital part of their national economy. In order to protect farmers and local communities, Revolver Cooperative buys all products from local co-operatives rather than directly from farmers, ensuring that financial benefits are spread across the community as well as safeguarding the rights of farmer’s employees.

Keep an eye on all our social media channels (@revolvercoop) to see updates from Josh as he travels.

From left to right; George Smith, Dom Smith, Paul Birch (CEO), Joshua Birch, Will Lowbridge, Calum Richardson, Helen Lloyd, Hannah Birch

Except where stated, this site and it’s contents are © Copyright 2020 Revolver Co-operative Limited
All Rights Reserved.
 © Revolver World 2020.